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INVESTIGATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF C60 NANO-RODS SYNTHESIZED BY SELF-ASSEMBLY & MOLECULAR RECOGNITION VIA LIQUID-LIQUID INTERFACIAL PRECIPITATION METHOD

Mtshali, CB (2007) INVESTIGATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF C60 NANO-RODS SYNTHESIZED BY SELF-ASSEMBLY & MOLECULAR RECOGNITION VIA LIQUID-LIQUID INTERFACIAL PRECIPITATION METHOD. Masters thesis, University of Zululand.

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Abstract

Nanotechnology is an emerging field of growing importance. The driving force behind the search for nanosize materials is the continuing demand for a decreasing in size and dimension of electronic devices, while optimazing their performance. With the reduction in size and shape control, these materials develop unique properties, which are size dependent in contrsat to their corresponding bulk materials. Fullerenes, exhibiting soccer ball structures and known as buckyballs, are unique carbon structures that have great potential for the multifunctional usage in future nanotechnological applications. The simplest of them all is C60 molecule which was discovered in 1985 using laser vaporization of graphite sheet in helium atmosphere, has a diameter of about 0.7 nm. The long term goal of the present investigation is to understand the metal or semiconductor- fullerene materials from variety of elements so as to be used in the electronic nano-devices. The combination of fullerenes with other elements can be achieved through endohedral doping, substitution doping, and exohedral doping (the formation of the clusters in a fullerene matrix). These C60 molecules can polymerize to form nano-rods with different shapes depending on different factors e.g. pressure, volume, time dynamic, etc….. Following the pioneering work of Miyazawa on the synthesis of these nano-rods by liquid-liquid interfacial method, this contribution reports on the effects of volume and concentration of C60/C6H5CH3 solution. The morphological, crystallographic, and vibration properties of these C60 nano-rods are presented.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Subjects:Analytical Science > Microscopy and probe methods
Material Science > Functional and hybrid materials
Material Science > Nanofabrication processes and tools
Material Science > Nanochemistry
Material Science > Soft materials
Physical Science > Photonics
Physical Science > Nanophysics
Material Science > Bio materials
Material Science > Nanostructured materials
Divisions:Faculty of Engineering, Science and Mathematics > School of Physics
ID Code:7266
Deposited By:Dr Balla Diop Ngom
Deposited On:18 Oct 2009 22:28
Last Modified:18 Oct 2009 22:28

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