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Intrinsically fluorescent carbon nanospheres as a nuclear targeting vector: Delivery of membrane impermeable molecule to modulate gene expression in vivo.

Ruthrotha Selvi, B and Jagadeesan, Dinesh and Nagashankar, G and Suma, B. S. and Arif, M and Balasubramanyam, K and Eswaramoorthy, Muthusamy and Kundu, Tapas K. (2008) Intrinsically fluorescent carbon nanospheres as a nuclear targeting vector: Delivery of membrane impermeable molecule to modulate gene expression in vivo. Nano Letters, 8 (10). pp. 3182-3188.

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Official URL: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/nl801503m

Abstract

In this report, we demonstrate glucose-derived carbon nanospheres to be an emerging class of intracellular carriers. The surfaces of these spheres are highly functionalized and do not need any further modification. Besides, the intrinsic fluorescence property of carbon nanospheres helps in tracking their cellular localization without any additional fluorescent tags. The spheres are found to target the nucleus of the mammalian cells, causing no toxicity. Interestingly, the in vivo experiments show that these nanospheres have an important ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and localize in the brain besides getting localized in the liver and the spleen. There is also evidence to show that they are continuously being removed from these tissues over time. Furthermore, these nanospheres were used as a carrier for the membrane-impermeable molecule CTPB (N-(4-chloro-3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-2-ethoxybenzamide), the only known small-molecule activator of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300. Biochemical analyses such as Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression analysis show the induction of the hyperacetylation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 (autoacetylation) as well as histones both in vitro and in vivo and the activation of HAT-dependent transcription upon CTPB delivery. These results establish an alternative path for the activation of gene expression mediated by the induction of HAT activity instead of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition.

Item Type:Article
Subjects:Biomedical Science > Nanobiotechnology
Material Science > Bio materials
Divisions:Faculty of Engineering, Science and Mathematics > School of Chemistry
ID Code:3865
Deposited By:JNCASR
Deposited On:03 Feb 2009 04:32
Last Modified:02 Mar 2009 09:12

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